How To Lose Stomach Fat In Men

September 19, 2009

There are a lot of methods that you may have read on how to lose stomach fat in men. Although exercise can be of help you but the easy dietary strategies experts who has been featured in bodybuilding and fitness magazines including IRONMAN magazine (US, Italian and Australian editions), Natural Bodybuilding, Muscular Development, Exercise for Men, Men’s Exercise and Men’s Fitness.

Here are some of the diatery strategies you can start immediately to lose your stomach fat :-

* Eat 5-6 small meals per day of relatively equal proportions.

* You should try to eat a meal about every three waking hours.

* Increasing your meal frequency is important towards losing body fat and promoting a lean body is that it helps to maintain a more stable and steady blood sugar throughout the day. This keeps your insulin levels more stable and allows you to be in a fat burning mode for more of the day.

* It is very hard to lose body fat when you’re only eating 2-3 large meals per day. In addition to promoting a leaner body, eating 5-6 smaller meals throughout each day will also provide you with more consistent energy levels without the mood swings.

* Plan all of your meals for each entire week and go to grocery store shopping with full stomach. By doing this you will only choose the items you need for your planned meals and eliminate the habit of buying junk foods (if you don’t have junk around the house, you most likely won’t eat junk).

* Eat a portion of lean protein at each meal, along with a portion of fibrous healthy carbohydrates, and a portion of healthy fats. Do not attempt to limit any portion of carbs, fats and protein since there play an equall ‘role’ in your body hormon and metabolisme.

* Focus on unrefined, unprocessed foods in their natural state. Processed foods mostly contains high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) and trans fats (hydrogenated oils, margarine, shortening). The food manufacturers are only concerned with maximizing profits, and do not take into consideration the consumer’s health.

HFCS is also found in ketchup, sweetened cereals, cakes, cookies, pasta sauces, barbeque sauces, salad dressings, and many other products.

* Focus on lower glycemic index carbohydrate sources for the majority of your meals, but don’t worry about avoiding healthy higher glycemic index choices like bananas, raisins, and carrots. These foods have beneficial nutrients and the glycemic response can be controlled if the portions are kept low and combined properly with other foods.

What I have shared with you is only part of the complete expert strategy, which have other other key ingredients that proven how to lose stomach fat in men.

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Only 44% Indians have clean hands

September 2, 2009

Indians’ hand-washing habits may not be up to sniffles, but Canadians have the cleanest hands, a hygiene survey.

While 90% of people surveyed in Canada feel that washing hands regularly is good protection against catching flu, only 44% of Indians believe the same, says an international survey, conducted by Global Hygiene Council supported by Dettol, in 2008.

Ideas of hygiene and health vary from country to country, and in India, food also comes into play: 20% of Indians believe that avoiding eating meat can keep the flu away, while other countries, especially Australia and South Africa, do not believe it at all.

The survey – which also covers South Africa, Malaysia, Italy, Great Britian, Australia and USA – revealed some interesting nuggets on people’s perceptions. The questions, on measures to prevent flu and washing hands, were posed to 1,000 respondents.

Cross-country

Even as 58% of people in Italy believe that avoiding public places is another preventive measure to prevent the flu, only 12% of Indians agree. While 71% of Malaysians believe a rubbish bin poses the greatest risk of transmitting germs to a person or child, 16% of Indians think the bin poses the greatest risk, while 44% Indians think the toilet seat is a risk best not taken.

Though 27% of Indians wash their hands for a minute after using the toilet, in Italy, 28% do so. However, 41% of people in South Africa wash their hands after using toilets, but only for five seconds.

Kiddy habits

When it comes to children washing their hands before eating, 79% of Indian kids obediently do so, while only 29% of Australians do, and 80% of Malaysians wash up before eating.

The survey says 45% Indian parents believe in asking their children to wash hands as they come home from school or nursery, to prevent them from picking up germs and becoming ill.

The importance of teaching children good hygiene habits was highlighted by the survey, which revealed that 50% of Indians do not wash their hands after coughing or sneezing, thus pushing up chances of picking up germs from each other. When someone coughs or sneezes, millions of germs can be expelled into the air, so it’s important that children understand the ways to protect themselves and their classmates from illness.

Suggestions

* Leftover food in lunch boxes should be discarded, and the box thoroughly cleaned. Crumbs in school bags can spread salmonella and cause gastrointestinal upsets

* Kids should be taught to clean even hard-to-reach areas like between the fingers, around the nails and even thumbs. They should know that just because they can’t see dirt on their hands, it doesn’t mean there are no germs

* When kids cough or sneeze, they should use tissue and dispose it in a bin. If they don’t have a tissue, teach them to cough or sneeze into the crook of their arm rather than into their hands – this way, bacteria and viruses aren’t transferred to their hands, and then on to the surfaces they touch, and on to other children

Top 5 illnesses picked up at school

Common cold
Stomach flu (viral gastroenteritis)
Ear infection
Conjunctivitis
Sore throat

INDIAN SOAP OPERA

12% believe avoiding public places prevents contracting flu
44% wash hands use regular soap
32% prefer anti-bacterial soap
3% use sanitizer
11% only running water